SePPCon 2016

Controlled Propagation Policy for Federally Listed Species

Lisa Ellis, US Fish and Wildlife Service

Lisa Ellis, USFWS, reviews the Controlled Propagation Policy for Federally Listed Species. The policy developed with input from the Center for Plant Conservation follows CPC guidelines. Lisa reviews the purpose and scope of the policy. Controlled propagation can be used as a recovery strategy, coordinated with other conservation actions in compliance with the species recovery plan.  Conserving genetic variation is an important component of controlled propagation, which can be documented through maternal lines and careful provenance records.  Formal and informal risk evaluation is also discussed.

This work was presented at the Southeast Partners in Plant Conservation (SePPCon) 2016 Meeting. Learn more about SePPCon here.

 

Date Recorded: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Endangered Species Act and Recovery Planning

Lisa Ellis, US Fish and Wildlife Service

Lisa Ellis, USFWS, reviews the components of the Endangered Species Act, terminology for endangered and threatened species, activities prohibited, and the recovery planning process. She reviews the new process and look of  recovery planning documents, supplementary documents (Species Status Assessment and Recovery Implementation Strategy) and defines viability - the likelihood of sustaining a population over time.  The Recovery Strategy Vision describes the conservation path toward representation, redundancy, and resilience.

This work was presented at the Southeast Partners in Plant Conservation (SePPCon) 2016 Meeting. Learn more about SePPCon here.

 

Date Recorded: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Safeguarding Mountain Bog and the Mountain Purple Pitcher Plant

Carrie Radcliffe, Atlanta Botanical Garden (SePPCon 2016)

Wetland species are particularly at high risk of extinction. The Mountain Bog Safeguarding is a Georgia Plant Conservation Alliance signature project that seeks to safeguard bog endemics from one of the rarest habitats in Georgia. This entails conservation horticulture, research, education and reintroduction. Meticulous records of a suite of rare bog endemic species kept during ex situ management allow for careful reintroduction to appropriate safeguarding sites in the wild. Carrie reviews the example of Mountain purple pitcher plant (Sarracenia purpurea var. montana).

This work was presented at the Southeast Partners in Plant Conservation (SePPCon) 2016 Meeting. Learn more about SePPCon here.

Contributing Author(s): 
Date Recorded: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Building Capacity in Plant Conservation

Mary Pfaffko, Georgia Department of Natural Resources & Georgia Plant Conservation Alliance (SePPCon 2016)

Mary Pfafftko, Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Resources Division emphasizes that the plant conservation needs can only be done with partnerships. She reviews the key elements of  State Wildlife Action Plans: species of greatest conservation need, key habitats, threats, conservation actions, monitoring plan, revision plan, coordination with federal, state and local agencies and Native American tribes, and public participation. She discusses funding opportunities for private landowners and NGOs, the restrictions on various funding sources, the states in the U.S that have authority to manage plants, and the differences in how each state approaches wildlife and rare plant management/ funding opportunities. She recommends models such as the Georgia Plant Conservation Alliance as an effective way to engender collaborations to help conserve plants. She describes Restoring America's Wildlife Act, a national effort to support State Wildlife Conservation Restoration Program and the Georgia Wildflower Preservation Act of 1973.

This work was presented at the Southeast Partners in Plant Conservation (SePPCon) 2016 Meeting. Learn more about SePPCon here.

Date Recorded: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2016

NatureServe: A Network Approach to Plant Conservation

Anne Francis, Leah Oliver, Amanda Treher, NatureServe (SePPCon 2016)

Anne Frances, lead Botanist reviews the programs of NatureServe in the Americas, how conservation status assessments are done and the unique role of ranks. Conservation status assessments help prioritize actions. She reviews the need for updating ranks as new information is gathered and the process by which that is accomplished. In the U.S. most flowering plants are apparently secure (G5), while almost one-third are categorized as G1, G2 or G3. Documenting the number of species that have gone extinct is a special project underway.

This work was presented at the Southeast Partners in Plant Conservation (SePPCon) 2016 Meeting. Learn more about SePPCon here.

Contributing Author(s): 
Date Recorded: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2016

CPC Best Reintroduction Practice Guidelines: Astragalus bibullatus Case Study

Matthew Albrecht, Missouri Botanical Garden (SePPCon 2016)

Reintroduction is a critical component of rare species conservation with the goal of continuing evolution in a natural context. Within the southeastern U.S. 81% of recovery plans include reintroduction as a proposed conservation action, while in Hawaii almost all plant recovery plans recommend reintroduction to ensure persistence in the wild. Following CPC Reintroduction Guidelines can help improve success. Ex situ conservation and in situ habitat management should precede reintroduction. Prior to reintroduction gathering information about species biology, genetics, mating system, interactions and habitat is advised.  Aspects of designing a reintroduction include considering genetic,demographic and horticulture. Whether a single or mixed genetic source should be used, how large a founding population and more questions are addressed.    Using an example of Astragalus bibullatus, Matthew describes several aspects of using experimentation to test hypotheses for improving reintroduction success.

This work was presented at the Southeast Partners in Plant Conservation (SePPCon) 2016 Meeting. Learn more about SePPCon here.

Contributing Author(s): 
Date Recorded: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Trees Will Adapt, Migrate or Die

Barbara Crane, US Forest Service, National Forest System (SePPCon 2016)

Barbara Crane, USFS, describes special considerations for trees.  Because the are long-lived, they cannot respond quickly to multiple threats from pathogens, fire, drought and climate change. Rates of historic migration of 300 to 1200 ft/yr cannot keep up with the rate of changing climate. Understanding genetic variation related to environment and response to change is necessary to conserve forest diversity. For the USFS Southern Region, which is home to 140 tree species, we developed a Genetic Risk Assessment System and identified the top 10 species at risk from climate change. Barbara gives examples of actions with several species and emphasizes that collecting from southern edge of a species range may capture valuable unique genes.

This work was presented at the Southeast Partners in Plant Conservation (SePPCon) 2016 Meeting. Learn more about SePPCon here.

Date Recorded: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Johnny Randall, North Carolina Botanic Garden (SePPCon 2016)

Johnny reviews the Center for Plant Conservation best practices related to the link between ex situ and in situ actions. Ex situ collections held as seeds or whole plants can help with research on germination or cultivation and reintroductions to the wild. He discusses clues that may trigger ex situ action, reviews the organizations that help guide the practice, and describes the link to the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation. He reviews patterns of where seed banking is practiced in the world and where it is needed and discusses the continuum of seed types that require different efforts for ex situ conservation. He briefly describes ethics and prioritization for collections, protocols for sampling genetic diversity, and techniques for processing orthodox seeds. Genetic concerns about ex situ collections include genetic drift, adaptation to cultivation, mutation accumulation and artificial selection.  He showcases the NCBG program and accomplishments with partners.

This work was presented at the Southeast Partners in Plant Conservation (SePPCon) 2016 Meeting. Learn more about SePPCon here.

Contributing Author(s): 
Date Recorded: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Joyce Maschinski, San Diego Zoo Global and Center for Plant Conservation (SePPCon 2016)

Joyce reviews the ethical considerations guiding our plant conservation professional conduct. Within the CPC, we have found that some actions are widely accepted standards, while others are context-specific and debated. CPC advises that practitioners are mindful of their institutional codes in collection policies or elsewhere. Standards include do no harm, get permission from landowners and agencies, know how to identify the species, and evaluate potential pest, pathogen or invasive behavior of the target species.  Guidelines for the amount to collect, documentation of collection, the kind of material you will be able to collect and conserve, as well as, what can be done with the material is discussed.  For further guidance, Joyce recommends reading CPC publications.

This work was presented at the Southeast Partners in Plant Conservation (SePPCon) 2016 Meeting. Learn more about SePPCon here.

Contributing Author(s): 
Date Recorded: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2016